Remittances and poverty in guatemala
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Remittances and poverty in guatemala by Richard H. Adams

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Published by World Bank in [Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Guatemala.

Subjects:

  • Poverty -- Guatemala.,
  • Income -- Guatemala.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementRichard H. Adams Jr.
SeriesPolicy research working paper ;, 3418, Policy research working papers (Online) ;, 3418.
ContributionsWorld Bank.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHG3881.5.W57
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3390446M
LC Control Number2004620125

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Get this from a library! Remittances and poverty in guatemala. [Richard H Adams; World Bank. Development Research Group. Trade.] -- "Adams uses a large, nationally representative household survey to analyze the impact of internal remittances (from Guatemala) and international remittances (from the United States) on poverty in. The author uses a large, nationally representative household survey to analyze the impact of internal remittances (from Guatemala), and international remittances (from the United States) on poverty in Guatemala. For instance, (Adams, (Adams,, found that remittance receipt have the greatest effect on reducing the severity of poverty among poor people in Guatemala and .   However, he finds that remittances have a greater impact on reducing the severity as opposed to the level of poverty in Guatemala. For example, the squared poverty gap - which measures the severity of poverty - falls by percent when internal remittances are included in household income, and by percent when international remittances Cited by:

Downloadable! The author uses a large, nationally representative household survey to analyze the impact of internal remittances (from Guatemala), and international remittances (from the United States) on poverty in Guatemala. With only one exception, he finds that both internal and international remittances reduce the level, depth, and severity of poverty in Guatemala. Remittances: A Key Factor for Economic Change and the Reduction of Poverty in Latin America – The Case of Guatemala: /ch International remittances to developing countries are growing and are more than foreign direct investment or the official development aid. More of Author: Reny Mariane Bake. remittances on poverty in Guatemala. Table 1 presents summary data from the survey. This table shows that households ( percent of all households) received no remittances, households ( percent) received internal remittances (from Guatemala) and households ( percent) received international remittances (from USA). Guatemala - A new IOM study shows that percent of people who send remittances to Guatemala live in the United States of America, followed by Canada ( percent) and Mexico ( percent).The survey was conducted among over 3, families in Guatemalan municipalities. The Survey on International Migration of Guatemalans and Remittances also indicates that remittances allow.

  International migration, the movement of people across international boundaries, has enormous economic, social and cultural implications in both origin and destination countries. Using original research, this title examines the determinants of migration, the impact of remittances and migration on poverty, welfare, and investment decisions, and the consequences of brain drain, brain .   POVERTY. Guatemala is Central America’s largest economy, but one of the worst-off countries in Latin America by income equality. About 60 percent of Guatemalans live in poverty, and that percentage is significantly higher among the indigenous majority. Many who migrate come from indigenous communities where Spanish is not the primary language. In , over half of all Guatemalans—about million people—lived in poverty, with about 16% living in extreme poverty. Guatemala rates among the worst in Latin America and the Caribbean for life expectancy, infant mortality and maternal mortality and while the education sector has made progress there are still important biases against the poor. After surveying 7, households in Guatemala in , Richard J. Adams found that international remittances decrease the squared poverty gap by %. 4 Even more convincing effects on poverty are shown by Richard H. Adams and John Page’s study of .